CASA Program

CASA Programs

CASA

Court Appointed Special Advocates

What is a CASA?

When a child is in the juvenile court system due to abuse or neglect, a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteer represents the best interest of the child in court hearings and many other areas of the child’s life. The purpose of CASA is to be the child’s voice in court, making sure children are safe, have a permanent home and have the opportunity to thrive.  Without a CASA, children may find themselves trapped in the court and child welfare system, spending their entire childhood moving from one temporary placement to another.

How does the CASA model work?

CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to advocate for children’s best interests. They stay with each case until it is closed and the child is in a safe, permanent home. Volunteers work with legal and child welfare professionals, educators and service providers to ensure that judges have all the information they need. Volunteers help judges develop a fuller picture of each child’s life. Their advocacy enables judges to make the most well-informed decision for each child.

What does a CASA volunteer do?

As a CASA volunteer, you will form a one-on-one relationship with a child to get a full picture of the case. A CASA volunteer’s work with children is one-on-one, but they do not work alone. Each volunteer is trained and supported by highly qualified CAPS staff member.

How can I become a CASA volunteer?

To change a child’s life for the better, click the volunteer link below. You’ll be trained and supported every step of the way.

Thank you to our national funder

For more information:

Apply Today
Contact Us
Optima Link
CASA Portal

Help CAPS Meet the Growing Need by Becoming a CASA Volunteer Today!

The Problem: overwhelmed systems

Child welfare systems are in a state of crisis, partly due to a devastating opioid epidemic.

More than 440,000 children are in foster care on any given day.

The average child in foster care spends more than a year in care.

The Solution: advocates from the community

Volunteer advocates are screened, trained and supported by CASA program staff.

CASA volunteers form a one-on-one relationship with a child and get a full picture of the case.

Judges depend on CASA volunteers for critical information to help them make the most well-informed decisions.

CASA

Court Appointed Special Advocates

What is a CASA?

When a child is in the juvenile court system due to abuse or neglect, a CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) volunteer represents the best interest of the child in court hearings and many other areas of the child’s life. The purpose of CASA is to be the child’s voice in court, making sure children are safe, have a permanent home and have the opportunity to thrive.  Without a CASA, children may find themselves trapped in the court and child welfare system, spending their entire childhood moving from one temporary placement to another.

How does the CASA model work?

CASA volunteers are appointed by judges to advocate for children’s best interests. They stay with each case until it is closed and the child is in a safe, permanent home. Volunteers work with legal and child welfare professionals, educators and service providers to ensure that judges have all the information they need. Volunteers help judges develop a fuller picture of each child’s life. Their advocacy enables judges to make the most well-informed decision for each child.

What does a CASA volunteer do?

As a CASA volunteer, you will form a one-on-one relationship with a child to get a full picture of the case. A CASA volunteer’s work with children is one-on-one, but they do not work alone. Each volunteer is trained and supported by highly qualified CAPS staff member.

How can I become a CASA volunteer?

To change a child’s life for the better, click the volunteer link below. You’ll be trained and supported every step of the way.

Thank you to our national funder

For More Information:

Apply Today
Contact Us
Optima Link
CASA Portal

Help CAPS Meet the Growing Need by Becoming a CASA Volunteer Today!

The Problem: overwhelmed systems

  • Child welfare systems are in a state of crisis, partly due to a devastating opioid epidemic.

  • More than 440,000 children are in foster care on any given day.

  • The average child in foster care spends more than a year in care.

The Solution: advocates from the community

  • Volunteer advocates are screened, trained and supported by CASA program staff.

  • CASA volunteers form a one-on-one relationship with a child and get a full picture of the case.

  • Judges depend on CASA volunteers for critical information to help them make the most well-informed decisions.